Home > General > AMANERO USB – I2S Interface

AMANERO USB – I2S Interface

Just received the package in the mail. (I ordered before the GB. It took about 18 days to arrive). Here are some photos

Group buy is here: [link]

Amanero Combo 384 (click to enlarge)

The audio clocks

The logic clock

The local ADP-150 ultra low noise regulators

The Xilinx CPLD

The Atmel ARM microprocessor

Output connections

The firmware update port

Size comparison (click to enlarge)

C27, L1 and C1 forms the PI (CLC) filter for the USB 5V power line. You could piggyback a larger capacitor on C27

Backside of board

Can there be a standard pin arrangement so boards can just plug-in to each other?

One more (click to enlarge)

More information in my previous post [link]

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  1. 2012/09/18 at 11:03

    I´m really curious how it sounds. Are you going to do some A/B comparisons?

    I’m also curious what you think about the WaveIO? I just received one and hope to start using it withing a week or so. I know it only supports sample rates up to 192 kHz, but higher format audio files are still hard to find, so this is good enough for me. A higher sample rate does not always mean that that it sounds better, it is really depending on the converter imo.

    • BlogGeanDo
      2012/09/18 at 14:24

      Haven’t tried it yet. Based on my past experiences, I can’t really tell this level of minutiae, so I’ve given up comparing (it is very tiring when you think you are hearing things and then when you do the comparison back and forth, they sound the same :-) ). I like to try different interfaces based on their engineering implementation and based on what I read and study. All of these interfaces are implemented in a more or less similar fashion where the clocking device is an FPGA or equivalent and the clocks are taken from discrete oscillators (and then multiplied or divided inside the clocking chip). They all sound very good.

      I also like the WaveIO very much, and I think it is also a great bargain. Lorien has squeezed the last ounce of performance out of the XMOS implementation. Based on “price per component”, it is even a better bargain than the Amanero board. He has chosen even lower noise regulators (7 of them, I believe) and even included a GMR isolator (I think I paid like $15 for the isolator alone). The only reason I don’t have a WAVEIO is because I have so many other interfaces…

      Ultimately, the performance of these boards are determined by the amount of jitter coming out of the clocking chips. Neither the XMOS nor the Xilinx CPLD has jitter specifications, but the Xilinx FPGAs extensively document their jitter performance. I believe the jitter performance of these devices are equivalent (in the hundreds of ps for period peak-to-peak jiter). The only way to get less jitter is to use a much, much simpler clocking device such as a flip-flop as implemented in Ian’s FIFO and clock boards. I think Lorien has hinted at implementing something similar in his diyaudio thread (if I remember correctly). I think Lorien is doing this for love rather than profit.

      I also think the same about high res. It is fun to experiment with, but when it comes to listening music, 99.99% or more of my collection is 44.1K

    • BlogGeanDo
      2012/09/18 at 20:33

      Hello Corpius, just took a look at your website. Do you plan to sell?

      • 2012/09/18 at 21:24

        I do, but it will take some time before I start selling. I have to arrange some permits first.

        I designed some PCBs for my own use and got some positive feedback on it when I showed them to some diy audio fanatics. There just simple but effective circuits. I never had any intentions to start selling, but if I order these PCBs I always get 10pcs! In most of the cases I just need one or two, so I figured that I could try to sell these “leftover” PCBs. At the moment I’m busy designing something interesting for your HiFiDUINO implementation, a Buffalo shield.

  2. Anonymous
    2012/09/19 at 14:26

    I’ve been told there is a new firmware flashing tool in the works that will allow to send custom event driven commands over an I2C bus. There will be a Windows tool to modify the firmware to suit each case/DAC needs.

    @GLT
    I was wondering if this finally comes true and works as expected, whether it could be used as some sort of external uController in an extremelly simple, small and cheap DAC based on TI’s DSD1793 IC. If it runs on sync mode (MCLK from Amanero board) and uses off board 3.3 & 5V PS (only headers on board), other than the IC itslef it’ll only require the LPF opamp mentioned in the DSD1793’s datasheet. Would this be possible or am I missing something?

    Cheers

    • BlogGeanDo
      2012/09/19 at 16:27

      It is possible. Pins 1 and 2 are reserved, so this could be the I2C interface. You will need an application or user interface (or control panel) that will send the commands to the uP in the Amanero board and relay the command to the DAC (for example to change the volume in the DAC).

  3. Anonymous
    2012/09/19 at 19:08

    That is precisely the idea, this is what I was told:

    -“Using a ConfigTool.exe you can select in a list of events what the board must do.

    For example when the sample rate changes you can choose to send in the I2C master bus ( pins called TWC.D ) a series of values to related addresses.

    Now i haven’t the complete list but you have events like,

    OnBoardPlugged – Init State
    OnBoard Select – This event occurs when the AudioInterface Is Selected
    OnBoardDeselect
    On44Khz
    On48Khz

    On384Khz
    OnDSDdetected
    OnI2SDetected
    OnVolumeChange
    OnMuteOn
    OnMuteOff”-

  4. Fred
    2013/07/24 at 17:08

    Anonymous :
    I’ve been told there is a new firmware flashing tool in the works that will allow to send custom event driven commands over an I2C bus. There will be a Windows tool to modify the firmware to suit each case/DAC needs.
    @GLT
    I was wondering if this finally comes true and works as expected, whether it could be used as some sort of external uController in an extremelly simple, small and cheap DAC based on TI’s DSD1793 IC. If it runs on sync mode (MCLK from Amanero board) and uses off board 3.3 & 5V PS (only headers on board), other than the IC itslef it’ll only require the LPF opamp mentioned in the DSD1793′s datasheet. Would this be possible or am I missing something?
    Cheers

    You seem to co-ordinate the Group buy. Please advise on how to nuy one; I am a new comer!

    Thanks

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